Friday, 13 March 2020

What are Microgreens ?

Photo by Monika Grabkowska on Unsplash

What are Microgreens?

Microgreens are seedlings of edible vegetables and herbs, they are miniature and range in size from 1" to 1 ½" long. The vegetable greens are harvested just after the first leaves appear from a germinating seed. 

 Photo by Russ Ward on Unsplash

What are benefits of consuming microgreens ?

It is thought that microgreens contain up to five times more vitamins and minerals than the fully grown plant. They are very healthy and good for your diet as they are packed with nutrients such vitamins, C, E, and K, lutein, and beta-carotene and also rich in potassium, iron, zinc, magnesium and copper.

How can you eat microgreens ?

Microgreens are best eaten raw, as they lose their nutrients if you cook them.  They are great eaten in salads, sandwiches, added to smoothies and commonly used as garnishes to increase the nutrient value of the dish as well to enhance the look, add texture and complete the dish.

Where can you get microgreens ?

Microgreens can be purchased from many online stores and from certain supermarkets and wholefoods stores. If you find it hard to source ready grown microgreens you can easily grow your own. You can purchase a variety of seeds from any online retailer such as Garden Seeds Market or at any garden centre. Once planted they only take 2-3 weeks before you can harvest your crop. If you grow them in rotation, you will always have a constant batch ready for use.


Photos from Garden Seeds Market

What's the difference between sprouts and microgreens ?

Sprouts and micro greens are not the same. Sprouts are seeds that are grown in water.  The germination process takes 2-3 days to form sprouts and then they are ready to be eaten. Microgreens are grown in soil or grown using a hydroponic method by using mineral nutrient solutions in a water solvent. You can grow microgreens from any regular herb or vegetable seeds such as radish, onion, basil, cress, kale, pea shoots, kohlabri, dill and coriander seeds. The seeds usually take 2-3 weeks to produce shoots and leaves. As soon as the new leaves form, they are ready to be picked and eaten.


How can grow your own microgreens ?
  1. Get a shallow tray and fill with a layer of potting compost.
  2. Scatter the seeds over the potting compost and cover the seeds with another thin layer of potting compost.
  3. Lightly spray the compost with some water and place the tray on a window ledge.
  4. Spray the tray daily just keeping the compost damp but not too wet. You should see the microgreens sprouting through the soil within 2-3 weeks. They are ready for picking once tiny leaves form.
How to store microgreens ?

Wash the harvested microgreens so that any dirt or soil is cleaned off. Pat them dry then wrap then in kitchen paper and store in a container in the fridge. They usually stay fresh up to a week if kept in this way.

It has become very fashionable in the culinary world to see dishes garnished with microgreens. They not only increase the nutritional value of the dish but they are a great garnishing ingredient too to enrich the look of the dish.

Do you use microgreens ? Which herbs and greens are your favourite? Do share in the comments.

**Post In collaboration with Garden Seeds Market

27 comments:

  1. Wow, I've been looking into how I can improve my diet so this article is super helpful. Thanks so much for sharing. All the best, Ell x

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    1. Thanks , I love the benefits different teas give you.

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  2. I thought microgreens was actually sprouts, so thank you for explaning that it is not. Will be adding more of this into my meals

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    1. Microgreens are the next stage from sprouting once the leaves form.

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  3. I thought microgreens was actually sprouts, so thank you for explaning that it is not. Will be adding more of this into my meals

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  4. I thought microgreens was actually sprouts, so thank you for explaning that it is not. Will be adding more of this into my meals

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  5. This is really interesting, never really thought about microgreens before. So is cress a microgreen? If so I eat a lot of that

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  6. Oh I love microgreens. When I was younger my mom used to grow them on the kitchen window. Garden Cress. Summer salads were amazing with it.

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  7. Yes they are healthy and good for your diet and easy to grow too.

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  8. I do use microgreens and love them but I don't have them too often. They do have amazing health benefits.

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  9. I would like to try this in the garden this year! They look so tasty!

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  10. I haven't used microgreens but as I am looking at simple ways to improve my health through my diet, I am going to be adding them in.

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  11. I've never heard of micro greens before, I'm not sure if I'd like them. I hate cress, it is too peppery in taste for me. I love many full blown greens though! Mich x

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  12. I did not realize there was a difference between sprouts and microgreens. I love sprouts so I am sure that I will love microgreens and I love that they are so good for you.

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  13. I didn't realise that this was something that you were able to eat, with amazing health benefits too

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  14. I would love to grow microgreens. This way I will have them when i need

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  15. I had no idea there was a difference between microgreens and sprouts so thanks for this informative post. I think my kids would love having a go at growing their own microgreens to use so will give this a try, thanks for sharing!

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  16. This looks good and healthy. I guess I should go and give it a try.

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  17. Ooo I would love to try and grow some microgreens...makes a dish look extra special and healthy too xx

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  18. I am happy you explained what micro greens are. Some people think it is just sprouts but it is so much more. Thank you on the tips to grow micro greens as well!!!

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  19. What an interesting read. I did not know that some of the things that I like to eat are called microgreens. Learned something new today.

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  20. Microgreens are popular here in dishes and are commonly found in the grocery stores. I don't eat much microgreens but they do look interesting.

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  21. We have been growing these with the kids at preschool and they watching them grow - not so keen on eating though LOL

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  22. what an informative post - since I work in culinary industry, we use them a lot for garnish because they are pretty and easy to form into pretty garnish bundles

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  23. Really interesting and informative. I only use them to add to sandwiches and not regularly. But Now I am really tempted.

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  24. I wish to grow microgreens at home too but Mumbai apartments are so small and mostly no balcony to grow fresh plants. I miss the luxury of my Chennai bungalow where I had a small kitchen garden too.

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